All Videos Tagged beef (HOMEGROWN) - HOMEGROWN 2014-10-23T05:15:05Z http://www.homegrown.org/video/video/listTagged?tag=beef&rss=yes&xn_auth=no The Straight Poop on Sustainable Farming tag:www.homegrown.org,2012-05-02:2263119:Video:136832 2012-05-02T16:01:14.492Z Cornelia http://www.homegrown.org/profile/CorneliaHoskin <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/the-straight-poop-on-sustainable-farming"><br /> <img alt="Thumbnail" height="180" src="http://api.ning.com:80/files/H24BEfnQ3BQexW52okbq1H8WDLj-GntgefAeVzPhuB8JiWLC7aaD-A-QinVir8-L5P97i4unlfPt8N6RUNh5otQsh*8BRKwa/999055227.jpeg?width=240&amp;height=180" width="240"></img><br /> </a> <br></br>Peak Moment 211: Innovative farmer Joel Salatin says sustainable agriculture requires both perennials (like native grasses) and herbivores (like cattle) to build soil. Mimicking patterns from nature, this maverick Virginia farmer rotates cattle followed by chickens into short-term pasture enclosures, where their poop fertilizes the earth. His new book "Folks, This Ain't… <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/the-straight-poop-on-sustainable-farming"><br /> <img src="http://api.ning.com:80/files/H24BEfnQ3BQexW52okbq1H8WDLj-GntgefAeVzPhuB8JiWLC7aaD-A-QinVir8-L5P97i4unlfPt8N6RUNh5otQsh*8BRKwa/999055227.jpeg?width=240&amp;height=180" width="240" height="180" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br />Peak Moment 211: Innovative farmer Joel Salatin says sustainable agriculture requires both perennials (like native grasses) and herbivores (like cattle) to build soil. Mimicking patterns from nature, this maverick Virginia farmer rotates cattle followed by chickens into short-term pasture enclosures, where their poop fertilizes the earth. His new book "Folks, This Ain't Normal" is a critique of the industrial food system, and envisions a future where humans are participants in a regenerative, sustaining community of abundance. [polyfacefarms.com]<br /> <br /> For a near-transcript of Joel's presentation that evening, visit <a href="http://www.peakmoment.tv/journal/?p=397">www.peakmoment.tv/journal/?p=397</a>. Grass-Fed Beef at McK Ranch tag:www.homegrown.org,2012-04-13:2263119:Video:135614 2012-04-13T14:01:01.130Z Cornelia http://www.homegrown.org/profile/CorneliaHoskin <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/grass-fed-beef-at-mck-ranch"><br /> <img alt="Thumbnail" height="180" src="http://api.ning.com:80/files/CSFk7mvLQAOK18huv5Oqu6KEGTAS9wc1g9NK7mrmQQaaU6ZxY-ZN08sotCMXV3fIaZmfEWbOv3SmCuunm-2TxL4-HnIbNnvy/781393608.jpeg?width=240&amp;height=180" width="240"></img><br /> </a> <br></br>Living Culture talks with David &amp; Bette McKibben, owners of McK Ranch in Dallas, Oregon. The McKibbens raise cattle on 200 acres of pasture. Their animals are grass-fed and grass-finished, with no added hormones or antibiotics.<br></br> <br></br> Living Culture is a monthly television series that showcases cuisine and agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Our mission is to generate… <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/grass-fed-beef-at-mck-ranch"><br /> <img src="http://api.ning.com:80/files/CSFk7mvLQAOK18huv5Oqu6KEGTAS9wc1g9NK7mrmQQaaU6ZxY-ZN08sotCMXV3fIaZmfEWbOv3SmCuunm-2TxL4-HnIbNnvy/781393608.jpeg?width=240&amp;height=180" width="240" height="180" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br />Living Culture talks with David &amp; Bette McKibben, owners of McK Ranch in Dallas, Oregon. The McKibbens raise cattle on 200 acres of pasture. Their animals are grass-fed and grass-finished, with no added hormones or antibiotics.<br /> <br /> Living Culture is a monthly television series that showcases cuisine and agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Our mission is to generate interest in local foods through inspiring and positive media. Cattle Ranching: "Herds West" 1955 12min tag:www.homegrown.org,2012-04-13:2263119:Video:135611 2012-04-13T13:58:22.319Z Cornelia http://www.homegrown.org/profile/CorneliaHoskin <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/cattle-ranching-herds-west-1955-12min"><br /> <img alt="Thumbnail" height="180" src="http://api.ning.com:80/files/tk-AfW0cO*ZEK-LETQBJBmiMFET0KoUf93-4kdHBsFQ-FJj1dZFCphRr8uC8W*oMs4UB6ylPBLWZpZbc8LrvA7Z8XnLorQM6/798883495.jpeg?width=240&amp;height=180" width="240"></img><br /> </a> <br></br>more at <a href="http://food.quickfound.net/">http://food.quickfound.net/</a> "Shows production of beef from the grasslands of the range to the feeding barns near big Western cities."<br></br> A fascinating piece of history, for sure. As an alternative, check out this video about a family's pastured beef operation in Oregon.… <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/cattle-ranching-herds-west-1955-12min"><br /> <img src="http://api.ning.com:80/files/tk-AfW0cO*ZEK-LETQBJBmiMFET0KoUf93-4kdHBsFQ-FJj1dZFCphRr8uC8W*oMs4UB6ylPBLWZpZbc8LrvA7Z8XnLorQM6/798883495.jpeg?width=240&amp;height=180" width="240" height="180" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br />more at <a href="http://food.quickfound.net/">http://food.quickfound.net/</a> "Shows production of beef from the grasslands of the range to the feeding barns near big Western cities."<br /> A fascinating piece of history, for sure. As an alternative, check out this video about a family's pastured beef operation in Oregon. <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/grass-fed-beef-at-mck-ranch">http://www.homegrown.org/video/grass-fed-beef-at-mck-ranch</a> Joel Salatin on grazing methods and carbon sequestration tag:www.homegrown.org,2010-07-14:2263119:Video:41888 2010-07-14T12:41:24.949Z Cornelia http://www.homegrown.org/profile/CorneliaHoskin <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/joel-salatin-on-grazing"><br /> <img alt="Thumbnail" height="180" src="http://api.ning.com/files/E-uuIePyRGwErnqa2xofFpD8m1z7PD7pAWYF1Oj*BE8zeDn-7VW9YWt8qGNACJ7MaoqGETS9PlHZBL9pBc6Zyy3G0D3Eg0Iv/625834898.jpeg?width=240&amp;height=180" width="240"></img><br /> </a> <br></br>From Throwback at Trapper Creek (<a href="http://matronofhusbandry.wordpress.com/">http://matronofhusbandry.wordpress.com/</a>):<br></br> I had read about the grass at Polyface and the difference they saw after implementing MiG, but until I visited the farm 10 years ago, they were just words on a page. After driving through Augusta County in Virginia during a drought in August 1999 and seeing… <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/joel-salatin-on-grazing"><br /> <img src="http://api.ning.com/files/E-uuIePyRGwErnqa2xofFpD8m1z7PD7pAWYF1Oj*BE8zeDn-7VW9YWt8qGNACJ7MaoqGETS9PlHZBL9pBc6Zyy3G0D3Eg0Iv/625834898.jpeg?width=240&amp;height=180" width="240" height="180" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br />From Throwback at Trapper Creek (<a href="http://matronofhusbandry.wordpress.com/">http://matronofhusbandry.wordpress.com/</a>):<br /> I had read about the grass at Polyface and the difference they saw after implementing MiG, but until I visited the farm 10 years ago, they were just words on a page. After driving through Augusta County in Virginia during a drought in August 1999 and seeing the endless brown fields and then seeing firsthand that at Polyface that the fields were still green and prosperous those words on the page became memories etched in my mind. Polyface looked like an oasis compared to the dried up pastures we had just driven by.<br /> <br /> It’s a long video but don’t be tempted to skip through it, the carbon sequestration possibilities are astounding! If there was ever a reason to wean yourself off of continuous, free range grazing this it. A plant that has deep roots can reach down to available soil moisture, and plant that has short roots cannot. Remember that roots are a mirror image of the top growth – short grass= short roots, tall grass = deep roots. It isn’t rain that will save a pasture, it is good management. And no one says it better the Joel – thanks Joel! Frankensteer tag:www.homegrown.org,2010-02-25:2263119:Video:32971 2010-02-25T15:51:20.372Z Cornelia http://www.homegrown.org/profile/CorneliaHoskin <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/frankensteer-1"><br /> <img alt="Thumbnail" height="180" src="http://api.ning.com/files/W8U1Sf20-NH9s6hFvrWGnFNRk6Kc5QIPer4h1tVKtc8TCzL8ogmD7d49nTqgwS4GZbeVRLABCJJGfvy7-uCvgzAYOdsFJ5MM/990732074.jpeg?width=240&amp;height=180" width="240"></img><br /> </a> <br></br>"When you bring a package of hamburger home from a supermarket, you have to treat it as toxic material." Mike McBane, Canadian Health Coalition<br></br> <a href="http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/frank.html">http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/frank.html</a><br></br> <br></br> FRANKENSTEER is a disturbing yet compelling documentary that reveals how the ordinary cow is being transformed into an… <a href="http://www.homegrown.org/video/frankensteer-1"><br /> <img src="http://api.ning.com/files/W8U1Sf20-NH9s6hFvrWGnFNRk6Kc5QIPer4h1tVKtc8TCzL8ogmD7d49nTqgwS4GZbeVRLABCJJGfvy7-uCvgzAYOdsFJ5MM/990732074.jpeg?width=240&amp;height=180" width="240" height="180" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br />"When you bring a package of hamburger home from a supermarket, you have to treat it as toxic material." Mike McBane, Canadian Health Coalition<br /> <a href="http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/frank.html">http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/frank.html</a><br /> <br /> FRANKENSTEER is a disturbing yet compelling documentary that reveals how the ordinary cow is being transformed into an antibiotic dependent, hormone-laced potential carrier of toxic bacteria, all in the name of cheaper food.<br /> <br /> The beef industry, supported by North American government agencies and pharmaceutical companies, has engaged in an on-going experiment to create the perfect food machine to increase speed of production and reduce the cost of manufacture. But there is a price in producing a cheap industrial product. This benign, grazing herbivore has undergone a radical rethinking in how it's raised, fed and slaughtered, including recent changes in inspection rules have shifted the responsibility for food safety from government inspectors to the people on the floor who do the slaughtering and packing.<br /> <br /> FRANKENSTEER reveals some startling facts. Every year 50% of the total tonnage of antibiotics used in Canada ends up in livestock. And every year cattle raised in massive feedlots are routinely dosed with antibiotics even if they are not sick. For public health safety reasons during the current BSE (Mad Cow disease) crisis, North American health officials have labeled certain parts of the cow as bio-hazardous products and have ordered that they be handled accordingly.<br /> <br /> And consumers, by and large, are totally unaware of the dangers lurking in their beloved steaks, ribs and, most especially, hamburgers.