HOMEGROWN

Celebrate the culture of agriculture & share skills (Growing! Cooking! Eating!)

Hello.  Hubby and I are wanting to raise some chickens to eat, and for eggs.  We are very interested in chickens that are not of a hybrid strain.  Any idea on where to start?

We have a little chicken house that we saw, and clipped to build, and will be revamping to our specs, and also don't have any idea on how many to raise to eat for a house of 3 for a year, yet, not overrun ourselves with eggs.

Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you

:)

Views: 411

Replies to This Discussion

I've heard that Freedom Rangers are great meat birds, and can't find a lot of information about them as layers. I love my Rhode Island Red for a layer... (My golden Sex Links are the best layers... but I think you would consider them hybrid...) At any rate. I've seen alot of posts about heritage meat birds, and those posts usually show Buff Orphingtons. I love mine, and they are a larger size than my RIR. They are also good layers, and have a reputation for going broody once in a while (mine never have) so you might even luck out and not have to hatch your own eggs!!  Personally, I think if I were going for a one breed fits all, I'd choose the BO. They are fairly decent size wise for meat, and good layers. They are one of the breeds I have that I believe are still laying here in the winter.

For a family of three, you'd most likely be getting an egg a day in the summer. If you account for an occasional broody/molting hen, you could probably plan to have 3/4 hens and have plenty of eggs for your family.

WOW!  Thank you for the info!  Greatly appreciated :)

rachel whetzel said:
I've heard that Freedom Rangers are great meat birds, and can't find a lot of information about them as layers. I love my Rhode Island Red for a layer... (My golden Sex Links are the best layers... but I think you would consider them hybrid...) At any rate. I've seen alot of posts about heritage meat birds, and those posts usually show Biff Orphingtons. I love mine, and they are a larger size than my RIR. They are also good layers, and have a reputation for going broody once in a while (mine never have) so you might even luck out and not have to hatch your own eggs!!  Personally, I think if I were going for a one breed fits all, I'd choose the BO. They are fairly decent size wise for meat, and good layers. They are one of the breeds I have that I believe are still laying here in the winter.
You're welcome!! I added a little bit about numbers in case you didn't see that, and edited to say BUFF orphingtons. Not Biff. lol

Kim Hutcheson said:
WOW!  Thank you for the info!  Greatly appreciated :)

rachel whetzel said:
I've heard that Freedom Rangers are great meat birds, and can't find a lot of information about them as layers. I love my Rhode Island Red for a layer... (My golden Sex Links are the best layers... but I think you would consider them hybrid...) At any rate. I've seen alot of posts about heritage meat birds, and those posts usually show Biff Orphingtons. I love mine, and they are a larger size than my RIR. They are also good layers, and have a reputation for going broody once in a while (mine never have) so you might even luck out and not have to hatch your own eggs!!  Personally, I think if I were going for a one breed fits all, I'd choose the BO. They are fairly decent size wise for meat, and good layers. They are one of the breeds I have that I believe are still laying here in the winter.

 Check out the Livestock breeds conservancy. http://albc-usa.org/ for heritage breeds.

I raise Delawares and previously Buckeyes, both dual purpose heritage breeds in danger of being lost forever. Both breeds are now in quite a few of the hatchery catalogs, though the supply is often limited.

There are a lot of dual purpose breeds out there, and depending on your situation there are different breeds to suit your set up and area. I chose the two breeds I've had for cold tolerance and mild manners as I live in OH and have kids.

Here's a decent breed chart

http://www.ithaca.edu/staff/jhenderson/chooks/chooks.html

 

We have seven hens (started with 12, lost a few along the line) that in the first year laid almost an egg a day. This is their second year and we average an egg every other day (per hen) which is perfect for my family of four. We occaisionally build up  an extra dozen or two that are begged for by family :o)  Though I'll give you some advice I wish somebody told me...in early fall use an ice cube tray to freeze seperated eggs as they will stop laying while they molt and you won't get any eggs for a few weeks to a couple months. Hopefully my girls go broody this year as I want MORE ;o) Which is another good thing about hertage breeds, they all will often raise their own as compared to a lot of newer breeds that it has been bred out of.

 

@Rachel,  RIR's are considered a dual purpose breed too, and were believed to be one of the parent breeds of Buckeyes who look a lot like them only they have a rose comb for better cold tolerance. Not sure about RIR's, but Buckeyes are very dark meat. Flavor is great, just very dark. RIR's are definitely the most popular around my area though for both meat and their dependable laying. I've just heard the roo's are often very aggressive.

I've heard that about the roosters too. I have a mutt rooster right now... lol He's a sweetie pie. I have heard amazing things about Delawares too. Good to hear from someone who has them that they are good layers. I had about the same results with my BO. So far, none of mine have gone into full molt, they just shed a lot, but keep laying. Just at a little slower pace. Good tip with the ice cube trays, especially for those of us that don't use artificial lighting to force winter laying.

Lesley Weaver said:

 Check out the Livestock breeds conservancy. http://albc-usa.org/ for heritage breeds.

I raise Delawares and previously Buckeyes, both dual purpose heritage breeds in danger of being lost forever. Both breeds are now in quite a few of the hatchery catalogs, though the supply is often limited.

There are a lot of dual purpose breeds out there, and depending on your situation there are different breeds to suit your set up and area. I chose the two breeds I've had for cold tolerance and mild manners as I live in OH and have kids.

Here's a decent breed chart

http://www.ithaca.edu/staff/jhenderson/chooks/chooks.html

 

We have seven hens (started with 12, lost a few along the line) that in the first year laid almost an egg a day. This is their second year and we average an egg every other day (per hen) which is perfect for my family of four. We occaisionally build up  an extra dozen or two that are begged for by family :o)  Though I'll give you some advice I wish somebody told me...in early fall use an ice cube tray to freeze seperated eggs as they will stop laying while they molt and you won't get any eggs for a few weeks to a couple months. Hopefully my girls go broody this year as I want MORE ;o) Which is another good thing about hertage breeds, they all will often raise their own as compared to a lot of newer breeds that it has been bred out of.

 

@Rachel,  RIR's are considered a dual purpose breed too, and were believed to be one of the parent breeds of Buckeyes who look a lot like them only they have a rose comb for better cold tolerance. Not sure about RIR's, but Buckeyes are very dark meat. Flavor is great, just very dark. RIR's are definitely the most popular around my area though for both meat and their dependable laying. I've just heard the roo's are often very aggressive.

I would add Welsummers to the list for an "old" breed that is considered multipurpose.  They are one of the breeds that lay a very dark egg, almost chocolate brown.

 

We have a mixed flock with Buff Orpingtons, RIR, Rocks, Wyandottes and Silkies.  We recently added Delawares and the Welsummers in September. 

THANK YOU RACHEL AND AMIKA!!!!
AND LESLIE!!!!!

RSS

Badge

Loading…

Join us on:

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

© 2014   Created by HOMEGROWN.org.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

Community Philosphy Blog and Library