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From the Crafting A Green World blog

I decided to make my own wine after a trip to a local farm, where we
came home with almost a gallon of muscadine grapes. A little searching
turned up this home made wine recipe, which you can use with grapes,
berries, or even apples! Here’s what you need:

* 1 quart of mashed local and/or organic fruit
* 3 quarts of water
* 6 cups of sugar
* 1 packet of yeast (Note from Carrie: go to a homebrew/winemaking supply store and get yeast that is for this purpose!! Don't just use bread yeast.)
* a one-gallon, air tight container
* a funnel
* a strainer or cheesecloth
* 4-6 empty glass bottles, for decanting (I collected empty wine bottles
and corks from friends’ recycle bins and washed the bottles out)
* recycled paper, for labeling
* tape to attach the label, measuring tape, scissors, and supplies to decorate

These are the directions for Kirk’s Muscadine Wine:

Dissolve the sugar in the water, and mix in the mashed fruit. Sprinkle
yeast on top. Do not stir until the next day, then stir the mixture once
a day for a week. Strain off the liquid into your air-tight container,
and set in a cool, dry place to ferment for 6 weeks. Strain your wine
again into the bottles you collected, leaving one empty bottle. Cork
them lightly for 3 days to allow for any more fermentation to cease.
You’re ready now to strain one last time! Strain the first bottle into
the empty one, then rinse and repeat until all of the bottles are
strained and ready to be decorated.

Grab your paper, tape, and decorating tools. You’ll want to completely
cover the bottles’ previous labels, so use your measuring tape to see
how tall the labels need to be. Wine bottles are not all the exact same
size, so also measure the circumference. Cut your labels and decorate
however you like. I kept it simple, using my mustache stamp on each
label. Once you have your labels how you want them, use a piece of tape
to attach one end to the bottle, wrap it around, then use either another
piece of tape or a glue stick to close it off.

There are some earth-friendly wines out there that have greener
packaging or are produced more sustainably, if you don’t have time to
whip up a batch of your own. There’s a real sense of satisfaction that
comes from drinking that first glass that your made yourself, though!

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Here is a link to a website with recipes for nearly any kind of wine you can think of. I've used this site's info for years and can vouch for their content.

Sorry Pat, the link did not show up. Would love to add it to the 101!

Pat Johnson said:
Here is a link to a website with recipes for nearly any kind of wine you can think of. I've used this site's info for years and can vouch for their content.

Oooops. I'll paste in in this time to be sure it works.
http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/request.asp



HOMEGROWN.org said:
Sorry Pat, the link did not show up. Would love to add it to the 101!

Pat Johnson said:
Here is a link to a website with recipes for nearly any kind of wine you can think of. I've used this site's info for years and can vouch for their content.

Yes, yes, yes. Jack Keller's site is truly the best site out there. When I started making wine, it was where I went (almost daily).

Keller is/was the authority. I had heard his health was declining...not sure how he is now. I haven't been to his site in a year or 2.

Thanks Pat. Have a great Thanksgiving.

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