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If you could pick ONE gardening book as your authoritative source, which would it be?

What book have you found to be the most helpful? Can you name just one? OK, maybe two.

Tags: authors, books, resource

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The Vegetable Gardener's Bible is really the only book I need - though I have many others.
As a complete Garden N00b, I look forward to responses here — I need all the help I can get. I did pick up Fresh Food from Small Spaces: The Square-Inch Gardener's Guide to Year-Round Growing, Fermenting, and Sprouting by R. J. Ruppenthal and am enjoying it, but I'm sure I'll need some more in-depth information.
Matt,
On my blog I have gardening book reviews that you might find helpful.

matt said:
As a complete Garden N00b, I look forward to responses here — I need all the help I can get. I did pick up Fresh Food from Small Spaces: The Square-Inch Gardener's Guide to Year-Round Growing, Fermenting, and Sprouting by R. J. Ruppenthal and am enjoying it, but I'm sure I'll need some more in-depth information.
I've been enjoying: The Veggie Gardener's Answer Book: Solutions to Every Problem You'll Ever Face, Answers to Every Question You'll Ever Ask (Answer Book (Storey)) by Barbara W. Ellis. Not sure if it's the one gardening book that's my authoritative source, but I'm just starting out!
The Encyclopedia of Country Living. I find it to be really thorough in all areas of gardening and homekeeping.
Right now its Growing Vegetables West of the Cascades. He's authoritative, and it's regionally focused, but sometimes I feel like he's veering off into diatribe/rant territory with his proscriptions...
My favorite is Backyard Homestead. It is a not only about gardening but has alot of useful information.

Beth aka oneoldgoat
The essential "book" you need here in Seattle is the Maritime Northwest Garden Guide by the Seattle Tilth.

When I was unsure about gardening, it seemed kinda boring, as it's really just a good list of what to plant when, but now that I've got some experience, it's a great reference, and with its small sections on normal pests and things to do in the garden, interspersed when you need to actually do them it's really about the only book you need if you are gardening in the Puget Sound.

Perhaps the most important thing about it, it reminds you that here you can always be growing a garden and while it's hardly ever to early to put in a spring garden, it's always way too early to start your summer garden.

Sure, it's May, but people! Don't put your tomatoes or basil out for another month!!!!
Not a complete noob to gardening, but I was a noob to CONTAINER gardening. Can't grow anything right now being in an apartment except in pots, and I got You Grow Girl by Gayla Trail, not just for girls though! It's an pretty awesome book! We're going to be moving out of an apartment soon, but it's a really great resource if you're growing in a small space or just want to start container gardening.
I can name one that I use every year - Rodale's All-New Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening

I also use its companion - The organic gardener's handbook of natural insect and disease control
Encyclopedia of Country Living
I use the Encyclopedia of Country Living and Golden Gate Gardening for issues specific to my area.

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