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Celebrate the culture of agriculture & share skills (Growing! Cooking! Eating!)

The older I get the more and more I realize I don't want to owe anyone anything, and we'd like to do as much as possible on our own. I was kind of zoning out and started thinking-

 

What kinds of skills should someone wishing to live frugally/homestead pick up or take classes for?

 

Here's a few I've come up with so far: 

 

*Gardening/Farming

*Cooking from Scratch

*Food Preservation (Canning/Freezing/Drying)

*Hunting and Fishing

*Livestock Care

*Sewing (Pattern to Finish)

*Plumbing Repair

*Electric Repair/Wiring

*Vehicle Maintenance

*Rough Carpentry

 

Any other skills you use that have come in handy? If so, where/how did you learn them? Books? Classes? Correspondence?

 

 

 

Tags: homesteading, self-reliance, skills

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You should learn how to knit. I make scarves and hats for my family, and am hoping to try gloves/mittens and sweaters soon. It's easier than I thought it would be, and very fulfilling. It gives you something to do on sweltering-hot summer days or bitterly cold winter days. Knitting also allows you to control where the material comes from - there are so many options out there!

Stitch 'n Bitch by Debbie Stoller is a good book to learn from. The Lion Brand website also has a great 'stitch library' and lots of free patterns.
Wow.... I cant think of anything off hand.

I learned several of my skills by reading books or just trying hands on.

I took the Master Gardener Classes through my extension office purely for all the information not because I desire to be a Master Gardner. The cost of the class and the 12 weeks of it were well worth the time and money and will serve me well way into the future.

It is getting harder to find older skill books in Libraries but some still have them.... the small town library hear has a book even on clock repair. The one in the city does not. My daughter has a loom and we do know how to weave so maybe that is another skill.
I've been interested to try it! I can crochet simple things like scarves and blankets, I guess I have an advantage there right? :)

Meghan Rosenbaum said:
You should learn how to knit. I make scarves and hats for my family, and am hoping to try gloves/mittens and sweaters soon. It's easier than I thought it would be, and very fulfilling. It gives you something to do on sweltering-hot summer days or bitterly cold winter days. Knitting also allows you to control where the material comes from - there are so many options out there!

Stitch 'n Bitch by Debbie Stoller is a good book to learn from. The Lion Brand website also has a great 'stitch library' and lots of free patterns.
My friend's grandma has a huge loom, I always wondered about it. I know you have to use a spinning wheel to first make the fibers into yarn/thread. It would be pretty cool to make your own cloth and rugs etc :)

Jennifer Chrispell said:
Wow.... I cant think of anything off hand.

I learned several of my skills by reading books or just trying hands on.

I took the Master Gardener Classes through my extension office purely for all the information not because I desire to be a Master Gardner. The cost of the class and the 12 weeks of it were well worth the time and money and will serve me well way into the future.

It is getting harder to find older skill books in Libraries but some still have them.... the small town library hear has a book even on clock repair. The one in the city does not. My daughter has a loom and we do know how to weave so maybe that is another skill.

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