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Fall-to-winter transition -- what changes in your home?

Closing up, pulling up roots, bringing in the worm bin, emptying pots. Now that we're reaching the end of farmers markets, and our garden beds turn withered, where will your food be coming from?
I, for one, spend a lot more time nesting and working at my kitchen stove - stirring stews and soups, roasting root veggies, warming my hands over the flame...One last gasp of canning this weekend cuz nothing else is fitting in my freezer!

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Leave a comment here for a chance to win a copy of the book "Small-Scale Grain Raising - An Organic Guide to Growing, Processing and Using Whole Grians for Home Gardeners and Local Farmers" by Gene Logdson.
I'm adding a protective cover to my outdoor window box garden to protect it from the squirrels who've recently taken to using it as a nosh and nap pad. Crochet is high on the list too (got to protect my neck, head, hands, and tootsies), as is doing some last-gasp fermenting, jamming, canning, and dehydrating (drying) of favorite foods for the winter.
I do not crochet, but I do notice the bears eating incredible amounts of acorns in my back yard, and nearby lake. I hear geese making their way somewhere. I notice that I am lugging wood upstairs to my fire place and wood stove. I love the smell of that wood. The view of bears, corn stalks in a field, and the smell of fires signifies that the seasons are training, and even though a first dismal; there is one fact to remember-spring brings renewal and redemption.
I try to bring the beauty of fall inside the house. I fill up a large glass bowl with mini pumpkins and gourds. I spend more time in the kitchen preparing hearty vegetable soups and making roasted sweet potatoes and other vegetables my kids will eat.
I love the smell of cinnamon. I have the fall flowers, mums, outside in pots. I am the only one on the block who doesn't "clean" up the leaves off the lawn.
We are lucky to have mild winters in Austin. I have lettuce, radish, carrots, and greens sprouting now. In January, I'll start the growing stations in the garage for early spring.

I almost like gardening in the fall and winter more - we get rain and it's not 100+ degrees!

Wish I had preserved more fruit though. :(
I'm just moving my plants in pots indoors and setting up some herbs in the window sill. I have also started knitting and crocheting things up for me and the family to keep us all warm.
It's harvest time here (West coast of Canada). The island apple orchards have produced in plenty this year and beyond the pies and applesauce, many folks are turning the fruit into juice for the freezer or bottling some lovely cider. As a beekeeper, fall means getting the hives ready for winter -- combining colonies that wouldn't make it on their own and providing some insulation against the wind and rain. And this year our community is taking steps to improve our local food security, coming together to talk about ways of turning individual passions for food and agriculture into larger scale community projects. Taking heed of advice from other community agriculture ventures to start planning in the Fall with aim of Spring and Summer fruition.
Made my first stew of the year and dug up the valerian for drying. Time for blending teas:)
This time of year my slippers become my second layer of skin and are on my feet at all times while indoors. I scuffle around the house in them, and put into action all those ideas from the summer that have to wait until the winter becuase the growing season is much too busy. Top on my list this winter: mending farming clothes and making mead!
I'm trying to get some things planted on our front hill so it doesn't erode! Yes, I'm late, but I live in CA (northern). Right now it's still warm. This time of year, the darkness falls so suddenly; I got an LED headlamp so I can finish whatever I'm doing before I go in for the night. The other day I finished harvesting scarlet runner beans. I'll be planting peas tomorrow. Fava beans are about 6" high - never done those before, but they're pretty & yummy, so there they are, right in the front yard.
Hi Michael! I lived in Austin for 27 years, but have been in St. Louis now for about 7. I miss Taco Deli down by Zilker Park by the greenbelt at the end of Spy Glass. I know that once in a great while there you can see ice on the palms. It's weird how everything just shuts down with some ice! Anyway, good to see a post from a fellow Austinite.

michael said:
We are lucky to have mild winters in Austin. I have lettuce, radish, carrots, and greens sprouting now. In January, I'll start the growing stations in the garage for early spring.

I almost like gardening in the fall and winter more - we get rain and it's not 100+ degrees!

Wish I had preserved more fruit though. :(
Just got finished baking some really good honey oatmeal cookies with raisins. Have also completed a knit cap project and the baby blanked for my newest granddaughter. The screens have come off the house and the storm windows put up in their place. The bee hives have been medicated, the entrances reduced and are about ready to be closed for the winter. It's been really rainy here lately so I haven't had enough time to bring in plants but that's on my to-do list.

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