HOMEGROWN

Celebrate the culture of agriculture & share skills (Growing! Cooking! Eating!)

I am just starting my garden. I would like to go chemical free, but already I have 2 fire-ant hills that I need to get rid of. Does anyone know of anything that Ican do to get rid of fire ants that does not require the use of chemicals?-thanks!

Views: 1890

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

you can try pouring hydrogen peroxide on them... that might work...
thanks mama hubbard. I will try that.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ant#As_pests

Freida, wikipedia mentions 2 organic methods that have proveneffective. Method 1 involves tracking the colony and flooding it with 14 gallons of water. Method 2 is to bait the ants with Borax, a naturally occuring mineral, also proven very effective as an anti-ant insecticide. While there is talk of enzymatic agents and biological agents, like parasites and bacteria, these methods arent really well researched yet. Try the borax first, it is not toxic to humans.
borax works, but you need to find a way for the ants to the borax take back, like mixing with something sweet. the key is finding the right mixture that keeps them alive long enough to share with others in the colony.

I never found this mix and finally called a local organics pest team to come out. They had their borax pre-mix and Diatomaceous Earth and it's helped alot.
thanks everyone! I will try the peroxide & the Borax and I will let you know what works.
While reading last night, i came across a site with many other organic options:

http://www.thefrugallife.com/ants.html

lots of good ideas there for organic ant control in case our earlier suggestions are not working.
despite what a lot of people think, diatenaceous earth, while considered organic, is actually not a very healthy or eco friendly resolution to insect problems. it is harmful to all insects - including the good ones - and is very bad for our lungs, as well as our pets.

diatenaceous earth is very sharp and fatally slashes insects. if i can eat it or breath it or injest it in some form, i dont think of it as organic. diatenaceous earth doesnt break down, either. it just scatters.

michael said:
borax works, but you need to find a way for the ants to the borax take back, like mixing with something sweet. the key is finding the right mixture that keeps them alive long enough to share with others in the colony.

I never found this mix and finally called a local organics pest team to come out. They had their borax pre-mix and Diatomaceous Earth and it's helped alot.
You are absolutely right. I found it best to be used lightly and locally, and of course, wear a mask!

mama hubbard said:
despite what a lot of people think, diatenaceous earth, while considered organic, is actually not a very healthy or eco friendly resolution to insect problems. it is harmful to all insects - including the good ones - and is very bad for our lungs, as well as our pets.

diatenaceous earth is very sharp and fatally slashes insects. if i can eat it or breath it or injest it in some form, i dont think of it as organic. diatenaceous earth doesnt break down, either. it just scatters.

michael said:
borax works, but you need to find a way for the ants to the borax take back, like mixing with something sweet. the key is finding the right mixture that keeps them alive long enough to share with others in the colony.

I never found this mix and finally called a local organics pest team to come out. They had their borax pre-mix and Diatomaceous Earth and it's helped alot.
I have had alot of luck with three methods. One is kind of fast but the others are more permenant.
1 You will need about 3 gallons of boiling hot water, and pour that on the mound, stiring the mound as it goes to get the hot water in it as much as possible. Dangerous to do.
2 Make pancakes using boric acid in the batter and letting the ants take it as a food source into the nest.. it takes a couple of weeks but the nest dies.
3 Food grade DE (not pool grade that will give you a lung issue like asbestosis) sprinkled around the mound ... will take about three weeks but is death to the nest also.
Should be fine sarah. If you added a lot of borax, you could hurt your soil. Borax naturally buffers soil to a pH range of 8 , and that can cause a harmful effect on many common crops. Borax is non-lethally toxic if ingested, in the range of 2-3 grams per kilogram of mass. This means that a 30kg child <66 lbs> would have a 50% chance of non lethal illness if she ate 50 or so grams of it <3-4 tablespoons> It isn't that tasty. Borax has been used for pest control and other agricultural purposes since long before the industrial era began.
ok I've been told this works every time... you need two brave people each with a shovel... position each person near a different fireant mound.. on the count of three each person digs a big scoop out of the fire ant den and runs to the other persons den and dumps the foreign ants on the den.... this ensues in a fire ant war where all ants are killed...

Honest to gosh, I've been told it works... be careful out there :)
thanks again everyone- I was going to use the Borax method, but after reading that it may affect my vegetables, I am a bit afraid of that. I went to "the frugal life" as recommended , and they had many different options to choose from , so maybe I'll try one of those. My problem now is that it has rained for the last 3 weekss straight in Mississippi,and I have not had a chance to try anything yet!

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Badge

Loading…

Join us on:

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Photos

  • Add Photos
  • View All

© 2020   Created by HOMEGROWN.org.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

Community Philosphy Blog and Library