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Canning meats is easy to do and is a great way to preserve the meat. More importantly to me is that it makes it convenient to have meat in a minute from the jar so I don't have to spend the time cooking it at mealtime. The basic procedure is to pack raw meat into jars leaving an inch of headspace. You don't have to add anything else. Just put the lids and rings on and process for 75 mnutes (pints) or 90 minutes (quarts). If you choose you may add spices & salt but I like to can mine without them so I can have a more versitile product when finished.

I can boneless skinless chicken breast with no additional liquid, salt or spice.

I then use it directly from the can to make great chicken salad. Just pour off the broth (maybe save it for rice the next meal) and flake it apart (it's really tender) and add the mayo, relish and whatever else you want in your chicken salad.

I also use the canned chicken to make pizza, quasidillias, salads and even stir fri where I just add it at the last minute (since it's already cooked). I sometimes just stir it in with a little BBQ sause and make a BBQ chicken sandwich.

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Replies to This Discussion

Karen, I haven't found myself able to EVER overcook my meat, or get a bad product from overprocessing.  In fact last summer, I packed forty pounds of chicken breast in the big roaster, and when I was carrying out the packaging to the dumpster, I broke my foot.  The meat slowcooked on 275 for over 24 hours until my sis could come out and help me can it.  I sat on a stool, and she carried things around for me.  We got it done, and it is fine!  Also, many times I slow cooked my meats for thirteen hours while I worked, and canned it as soon as I got home.  I just don't worry about overprocessing any more.  I also have started using one canner to pressure cook meats for about forty mins, then canning it, when I want to get it done faster.  Canning is something I have found will work into about any schedule if you put the right tools together.

Pot roast is one of the nicest treats you can store, although we go through a lot of turkey and chicken, ham, and corned beef too.  One time I even found a big cone of gyro meat, and slow roasted that and canned it.  Hubby drains it, and fries it up in a skillet for quick gyros.

If you raw pack a beef roast and pressure can it for 75 minutes (pints) or 90 minutes (quarts) it will come out just like you describe Karen (tender and able to be flaked apart with a fork). Browning it first gives it that extra taste and can enhance the experience but it will be tender regardless. Like Sparky, I agree that you don't have to be too worried about over processing but I wouldn't do any more to the meat than absolutely nessessary because nutrients & vitamins are affected even if the texture is not.

Sparky, I'm not sure I understand what you meant about "using one canner to pressure cook meats for about forty mins, then canning it, when I want to get it done faster". While there may be ways to get around the recomended processing times for meat (75 & 90 minutes), on this site we have beginners as well as master canners so we better stick to the recomended processing times. If you use those recomended times there is no need to cook the meat before.

hold on!!!  NO, you misunderstand!  I simply use one canner to pressure cook the meat first, rather than slow cook.  I then use the proper procedure to pressure can according to standards!  I have several canners, and often cook in one, and can in the other, or can with two at once.  I am glad you said something. I don't wish to be misunderstood nor would I give bad advice! My precooking of the meat is not necessary, but like browning, it is personal preference.  To me the flavor is worth the extra time involved.

Good deal Sparky. I was just trying to make sure we were on the same page. Sounds like you are going to be a good source of info on this site. We need experienced folks to keep the rest of us on track! Keep up the good work!
SOLD!  Roast just went to the top of my list!  I think you should post this over on the Self-Reliant Moms board too!  Thanks, so much!

sparky said:

Karen, I haven't found myself able to EVER overcook my meat, or get a bad product from overprocessing. . . Also, many times I slow cooked my meats for thirteen hours while I worked, and canned it as soon as I got home. . . . I also have started using one canner to pressure cook meats for about forty mins, then canning it, when I want to get it done faster.  Canning is something I have found will work into about any schedule if you put the right tools together. . . /p>

 

Pat:  "Sparky" is a gold mine of info.  Sometime when you've got some time to kill, go over to SRM and check out the archives.  (She doesn't go by "Sparky" over there, but you'll spot her very quickly.)  She's AMAZING!  I keep telling her she needs to write a book!  (She can tell you how to repair canners too!)

Pat Johnson said:
Good deal Sparky. I was just trying to make sure we were on the same page. Sounds like you are going to be a good source of info on this site. We need experienced folks to keep the rest of us on track! Keep up the good work!

Karen, lol.  Sometime when you are bored to tears, which I know doesn't happen often... start at the back of the canning and preserving group, and just start reading forward.  I love to do this every so often, because I remember things that I wanted to do or try, or something I wanted to research.  It is really fascinating, and you will probably love doing the other groups the same way.  You will see that by this time I am repeating things often just to save the trouble of telling people to read the old comments.  I will admit that the use of the second pressure canner is somewhat new, and I really just tried it one time because the roaster was full, and I had more meat than it would hold.  I figured if I used one canner to pressure cook, I could have that meat canned and done by the time the roaster full was ready.  It worked out beautifully, and the meat was done so fast that I decided to use that as another choice method!  :)

 

Thanks too for the sweet words of praise.  I enjoy teaching others to do these things.  If we don't teach, who will?

Karen Cunningham said:

SOLD!  Roast just went to the top of my list!  I think you should post this over on the Self-Reliant Moms board too!  Thanks, so much!

sparky said:

Karen, I haven't found myself able to EVER overcook my meat, or get a bad product from overprocessing. . . Also, many times I slow cooked my meats for thirteen hours while I worked, and canned it as soon as I got home. . . . I also have started using one canner to pressure cook meats for about forty mins, then canning it, when I want to get it done faster.  Canning is something I have found will work into about any schedule if you put the right tools together. . . /p>

 

You're welcome, but you've more than earned the praise.  I've learned a lot from you.  I actually did start back at the beginning and began going through the archives, but there are so many pages that I've only gotten about a dozen pages read.  It's on my to-do list, though.

      But the question I have is which method makes the roast taste the BEST?  I'm all for having speedy prepared meals on hand, but the BEST TASTE is my first concern.  8-)

sparky said:

Karen, lol.  Sometime when you are bored to tears, which I know doesn't happen often... start at the back of the canning and preserving group, and just start reading forward.  You will see that by this time I am repeating things often just to save the trouble of telling people to read the old comments..  I will admit that the use of the second pressure canner is somewhat new, and I really just tried it one time because the roaster was full, and I had more meat than it would hold.  I figured if I used one canner to pressure cook, I could have that meat canned and done by the time the roaster full was ready.  It worked out beautifully, and the meat was done so fast that I decided to use that as another choice method!  :)

 

Thanks too for the sweet words of praise.  I enjoy teaching others to do these things.  If we don't teach, who will?

I really like my chicken and turkey slow roasted.  The corned beef did amazingly well in the pressure cooker.  I cooked it about half way, then canned it.

Pot roast?  Well, slow roasted with coffee, absolutely heaven.  And the best gravy or beef manhattans ever made.  For those of you who don't know, a Beef Manhattan is an open faced sandwich, bread on the bottom, mashed potatoes, then roast and gravy.  But the pressure canner also does a great job on the roast...  :)

     What kind of a roaster do you use for your chicken and turkey?  Are you talking about an electric roaster or the covered roasting pans you get that you throw into the oven?

     Did I tell you I went to make your roast with the coffee and some boob had used up the last bit of coffee?  I wound up browning it in the skillet, then threw it into the crockpot.  I dumped a can of Campbell's Golden Mushroom Soup in and a packet of Lipton's Dried Onion Soup Mix.  Cooked it for about eight hours, and it was the best roast I've ever had.

     Still going to try that coffee trick, though.  Sounds yummy!



sparky said:

I really like my chicken and turkey slow roasted.  The corned beef did amazingly well in the pressure cooker.  I cooked it about half way, then canned it.

Pot roast?  Well, slow roasted with coffee, absolutely heaven.  And the best gravy or beef manhattans ever made.  For those of you who don't know, a Beef Manhattan is an open faced sandwich, bread on the bottom, mashed potatoes, then roast and gravy.  But the pressure canner also does a great job on the roast...  :)

What is SRM?

 

Sorry!  It's "Self-Reliant Moms of America."  Why they named it that, I'll never know, because it's not just for moms nor just females.  It's for anybody interested in self-reliant living.  You can find it at:   http://selfreliantmoms.ning.com/ 

Pat Johnson said:

What is SRM?

 

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